Really interesting piece on Francesco Guardi here from eclecticlight

The Eclectic Light Company

In the second article in this series, I remarked how in the latter half of the eighteenth century, a hundred years before the birth of Impressionism, the Venetian painter Francesco Guardi used very painterly marks in his views of Venice. My example was a late view of the Piazza San Marco (c 1775).

Francesco Guardi (1712-1793), The Piazza San Marco, Venice (c 1775), oil on canvas, 55.2 x 85.4 cm, Scottish National Gallery, Edinburgh. By Ad Meskens, via Wikimedia Commons. Francesco Guardi (1712-1793), The Piazza San Marco, Venice (c 1775), oil on canvas, 55.2 x 85.4 cm, Scottish National Gallery, Edinburgh. By Ad Meskens, via Wikimedia Commons.

This fascinating painting is in the Scottish National Gallery, Edinburgh, and Guardi’s loose brushwork can be seen in a detail from it.

guardipiazzasanmarcodet Francesco Guardi (1712-1793), The Piazza San Marco, Venice (detail) (c 1775), oil on canvas, 55.2 x 85.4 cm, Scottish National Gallery, Edinburgh. By Ad Meskens, via Wikimedia Commons.

Since then I have been able to find out much more about Guardi and his painterly works. As he is…

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3 thoughts on “Visible brushstrokes: 4. the curious case of Francesco Guardi

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